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Writer's Statement

The largest jail in the United States houses the worst of the worst. The average sentence for its inmates is 91 years. There are 85 convicts on death row. One man convicted of raping 120 women is serving 2,574 years with 19 life sentences on top of that.

"There has been more human suffering on this
piece of land than anywhere else in America.”

- Burl Cain, Warden, Angola.

Angola has been a violent place. For more than 100 years it was the most dangerous prison in America. Before the Civil War it was a slave-breeding plantation named after the African state where the slaves were captured. When the Civil War ended and the slaves were freed, Angola became a prison farm.

For inmates who face life behind bars, the Angola Prison Rodeo offers diversion, but also a way to vent frustration and anger. The rodeo began about 40 years ago using bulls from the prison's cattle ranch. Its popularity has grown over the years and today the rodeo is held every Sunday in October and two Sundays in April, and gives trusted inmates a chance to mix freely with the public. It's big business for the prison, bringing in tourists and inmates' families and friends who fill its 7,500 seat stadium.

For other inmates, Angola Radio is "The number one incarceration station that kicks behind the bricks." That's the motto of KLSP FM, the low-powered radio station officially licensed to the Louisiana State Penitentiary more commonly known as Angola. It's just like every other radio station with one major exception: the DJs are tuned in for life.
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IN DEVELOPMENT

TS Pictures presents

Written by Tim Ryerse

Executive Producers Tim Ryerse
and Scott Forslund

Synopsis

“There’s something unnatural about that boy,” declares Warden Chud Kurtis describing Luke Ferryman, who was raised in a brothel and railroaded by a court for a murder he didn’t commit. Given the tag “baby killer,” he’s nearly beaten to death by other prisoners in a boxcar headed for Louisiana’s infamous Angola prison in 1961.

Luke finds comfort while recovering in the care of Mahalia, a candy-striper nurse who can see past the darkness to the good in him. In time, she becomes both his lover and ally as he descends into the bowels of incarceration. There, he’s guided by Victor the pious “preacher man” and Titus an unknown guitar prodigy. “There's hundreds of unmarked graves here; even the dead don't get outa Angola,” he’s told.

But Luke is consumed by the musical passion that drives him, and haunted by his abusive, alcoholic father, he devises a crazy plan. He turns his cursed namesake into a key to redemption by writing a song so tragic and moving he believes it will convince the Governor to pardon him as he did legendary Lead Belly. But the Warden is committed to orchestrating the death of the baby killer. He transfers a mass murderer into Luke’s cell, Clancy Jones, who’s bitten the jugular out of a guard’s neck and broken the back of another who tried to cuff him.

Luke’s only chance is to pass a tape recording of his music to the visiting Governor at the annual Angola Prisoner’s Rodeo, a gut-wrenching event where killers become gladiators for a chance at more freedom within the walls. But the odds are stacked against Luke. It will take strong faith, a touch of luck and intense willpower to pull off his plan and leave a free man.

© 2018 by Tim Ryerse. All Rights Reserved.

The House of the Rising Son screenplay is available upon request for those interested in this project. Please contact us for a link to the screenplay and treatment, and other information.

The Song

"House of the Rising Sun" has a complex history. It’s been said that miners were familiar with it as early as 1905. The oldest published version of the lyrics was printed in Adventure magazine in 1925 by Robert Winslow Gordon in a column titled "Old Songs that Men Have Sung.”

The oldest known recording of the song under the title "Rising Sun Blues" is by Appalachian artists Clarence "Tom" Ashley and Gwen Foster who recorded it for Vocalion Records in 1933. Ashley said he had learned it from his grandfather. An interesting sidelight is that Roy Acuff was mentored by Ashley, who taught it to him, and he recorded it as "Rising Sun" in 1938.

In 1937 folklorist Alan Lomax, a curator of the American Folk Song Archive at the Library of Congress, recorded a performance of the song by Georgia Turner, the 16-year-old daughter of a local miner. It was also titled “Rising Sun Blues” and Lomax credited the lyrics of that recording to Turner. Her adaptation of the American folk classic, better known as "House of the Rising Sun," has become the cover for hundreds of performers since including Roy Acuff, Dave Van Ronk, Bob Dylan, The Animals, Joan Baez, Tracy Chapman, Muse, and even Andy Griffith.

Georgia Turner's 1937 recording of "Rising Sun Blues"

Like many classic folk ballads, "House of the Rising Sun" is of uncertain authorship. Musicologists say that it is based on the tradition of broadside ballads and thematically it has some resemblance to the 16th century ballad "The Unfortunate Rake." The "Rising Sun" in the title has been purported to be, among other things, a bawdy house in England, an English pub, and a house of ill repute in New Orleans.

IN DEVELOPMENT

Stacks Image 132

TS Pictures presents

Written by Tim Ryerse

Executive Producers Tim Ryerse
and Scott Forslund

Synopsis

“There’s something unnatural about that boy,” declares Warden Chud Kurtis describing Luke Ferryman, who was raised in a brothel and railroaded by a court for a murder he didn’t commit. Given the tag “baby killer,” he’s nearly beaten to death by other prisoners in a boxcar headed for Louisiana’s infamous Angola prison in 1961.

Luke finds comfort while recovering in the care of Mahalia, a candy-striper nurse who can see past the darkness to the good in him. In time, she becomes both his lover and ally as he descends into the bowels of incarceration. There, he’s guided by Victor the pious “preacher man” and Titus an unknown guitar prodigy. “There's hundreds of unmarked graves here; even the dead don't get outa Angola,” he’s told.

But Luke is consumed by the musical passion that drives him, and haunted by his abusive, alcoholic father, he devises a crazy plan. He turns his cursed namesake into a key to redemption by writing a song so tragic and moving he believes it will convince the Governor to pardon him as he did legendary Lead Belly. But the Warden is committed to orchestrating the death of the baby killer. He transfers a mass murderer into Luke’s cell, Clancy Jones, who’s bitten the jugular out of a guard’s neck and broken the back of another who tried to cuff him.

Luke’s only chance is to pass a tape recording of his music to the visiting Governor at the annual Angola Prisoner’s Rodeo, a gut-wrenching event where killers become gladiators for a chance at more freedom within the walls. But the odds are stacked against Luke. It will take strong faith, a touch of luck and intense willpower to pull off his plan and leave a free man.

© 2018 by Tim Ryerse.
All Rights Reserved.

The House of the Rising Son screenplay is available upon request for those interested in this project. Please contact us for a link to the screenplay and treatment, and other information.

The Song

"House of the Rising Sun" has a complex history. It’s been said that miners were familiar with it as early as 1905. The oldest published version of the lyrics was printed in Adventure magazine in 1925 by Robert Winslow Gordon in a column titled "Old Songs that Men Have Sung.”

The oldest known recording of the song under the title "Rising Sun Blues" is by Appalachian artists Clarence "Tom" Ashley and Gwen Foster who recorded it for Vocalion Records in 1933. Ashley said he had learned it from his grandfather. An interesting sidelight is that Roy Acuff was mentored by Ashley, who taught it to him, and he recorded it as "Rising Sun" in 1938.

In 1937 folklorist Alan Lomax, a curator of the American Folk Song Archive at the Library of Congress, recorded a performance of the song by Georgia Turner, the 16-year-old daughter of a local miner. It was also titled “Rising Sun Blues” and Lomax credited the lyrics of that recording to Turner. Her adaptation of the American folk classic, better known as "House of the Rising Sun," has become the cover for hundreds of performers since including Roy Acuff, Dave Van Ronk, Bob Dylan, The Animals, Joan Baez, Tracy Chapman, Muse, and even Andy Griffith.

Georgia Turner's 1937 recording
of "Rising Sun Blues"

Like many classic folk ballads, "House of the Rising Sun" is of uncertain authorship. Musicologists say that it is based on the tradition of broadside ballads and thematically it has some resemblance to the 16th century ballad "The Unfortunate Rake." The "Rising Sun" in the title has been purported to be, among other things, a bawdy house in England, an English pub, and a house of ill repute in New Orleans.
Stacks Image 164

Writer's Statement

The largest jail in the United States houses the worst of the worst. The average sentence for its inmates is 91 years. There are 85 convicts on death row. One man convicted of raping 120 women is serving 2,574 years with 19 life sentences on top of that.

"There has been more human suffering on this piece of land than anywhere else in America.”

- Burl Cain, Warden, Angola.

Angola has been a violent place. For more than 100 years it was the most dangerous prison in America. Before the Civil War it was a slave-breeding plantation named after the African state where the slaves were captured. When the Civil War ended and the slaves were freed, Angola became a prison farm.

For inmates who face life behind bars, the Angola Prison Rodeo offers diversion, but also a way to vent frustration and anger. The rodeo began about 40 years ago using bulls from the prison's cattle ranch. Its popularity has grown over the years and today the rodeo is held every Sunday in October and two Sundays in April, and gives trusted inmates a chance to mix freely with the public. It's big business for the prison, bringing in tourists and inmates' families and friends who fill its 7,500 seat stadium.

For other inmates, Angola Radio is "The number one incarceration station that kicks behind the bricks." That's the motto of KLSP FM, the low-powered radio station officially licensed to the Louisiana State Penitentiary more commonly known as Angola. It's just like every other radio station with one major exception: the DJs are tuned in for life.